I hope it's not too late for a real start? | cpjobs.com
Home > Career Advice > Career Doctors > I hope it's not too late for a real start?

I hope it's not too late for a real start?

Question :

I am a 29 year old female who is going to turn 30 this year. During my 20s, I spent 7 years in tertiary education. I got a Higher Diploma in PR (2 years) and a Bachelor degree in Nursing (4 years) plus a year of defer due to failure in nursing practicum.

Just like many people, entering university was my aim in secondary school but I was not sure what I want to do for living, nor really put effort in any job in that period. Therefore when opportunity come, I chose a nursing degree which could guarantee stability of income and seemed more valuable, rather than English literature degree which was my passion but without clear job direction and guarantee.

I started work as a nurse since July 2011, and till now, I changed my job 3 times and the 4th time is coming. I needed to put big effort in adapting and it was basically a brain-damaged experience for me. I was found out not competent and not suitable for the fast-paced medical field. Even worse, in the deepest, I knew myself resistant to basic nursing skills like inserting foley or injection. Some colleagues even suspect I have concentration problem and suggest me see a doctor.

For years I knew I was depressed. And for years, I was trying to fit into some work that I am not capable no matter how I work on or simply people around me don’t give me tolerance. I finally come to conclusion that I will stop trying as I have no way to go and the only right direction to my happiness is, maybe leaving the industry.

Here are my thoughts:

1.    Find a whatever job, aiming 12-4K per month and do part-time private nursing to supplement income.
2.    Find a part-time job to get experienced, equip myself with skills by revising Mandarin, English & Chinese typing. Further my qualification in field such as translation or journalism in fall 2014.

My biggest worry is still stability. I want to lead a happier life and develop potentials. Could you give me some advice? I don’t want my effort become futile.

I have devoted nearly 7 years in tertiary education and I started work as a registered nurse since July 2011. I switched work 3 times and now the fourth time is coming.

Like lots of people, I was not sure what I want to do in my young age, therefore I chose to persuit a degree which could guarantee stability of income despite my passion.

Since I start work in nursing, I needed to put big effort in adapting and it was basically a brain-damaged experience for me. My ability and temperament was also not suitable for the fast-paced environment. Even worse, in the deepest, I knew myself resistant to basic nursing skills like inserting foley or injection.  I am also a not reliable person and some colleagues doubt I have problem in concentration.

Posted by Renee on Sunday, 26 Jan 2014

Comments :

Debbie Matson - Career Doctor

Posted Wednesday 19th February 2014 10:20:00 PM

 

Dear Renee You seem to have spent your 20’s pursuing things you knew you wouldn’t like. As you have discovered, no profession is stable if you are physically and mentally unsuited for it. I can see from your letter that you are really suffering in your current position as a nurse and stressed because of your desire to find a new direction. First of all I think you should seek some professional help from a psychologist or therapist. You have good insight into your lack of motivation and desire but it sounds like you are rushing to your next job without solving problems of depression and concentration. A good therapist may help you take a first step into stabilizing your feelings and allowing you to concentrate on an important task – the task – seeing opportunities rather than obstacles. You should start with the easy steps first. Go back to the English department of your University and see a trusted professor and a guidance counselor. Ask them for advice about career paths that other students have taken. You may want to contact some of the former students and network with them. As you seek advice, make sure to outline that while English is your passion, you need to focus on roles that offer stable work environments and income levels. Attend alumni events from your school and look for other industry events such as conferences or after-work speakers where inspiring people may be found. Listen to the speakers, and to the people you meet. Ask everyone you meet to tell you about their job and how they got to it. Ask people to tell you about their favorite job and find out what made it good for them. Sometimes it isn’t the role, per se, but the quality of the work, the people and the environment. Also, reflect on what is so bad for you about nursing. If you don’t have the speed and dexterity for the work, make sure not to go into a field requiring those skills. Maybe you don’t function well under the pressure of tight deadlines and prefer more routine tasks? Don’t just jump into any job now. Make change after you have really figured out what will work for you and will enable you to build a future. In the meantime, while you are working as a nurse, focus, concentrate, and make sure that you do the best job you possibly can. You will want colleagues and supervisors to think well of you and to be available as references later on. Good luck and I hope you find a new role that gives you more satisfaction.

Become our fans